Tuesday, June 30, 2015

New Mexico 4-H members, their dogs learn the skills of working together

New Mexico 4-H members, their dogs learn the skills of working together DATE: 06/30/2015 WRITER: Jane Moorman, 505-249-0527, jmoorman@nmsu.edu CONTACT: Linda Herrera, 505-264-5412, nm4hdogschool@gmail.com Relationships are built on trust and communication – whether it is between humans or with their four-legged friends. Youth have an opportunity to develop communication skills with their dogs by participating in a 4-H Dog Project. The National 4-H Dog Project curriculum consists of three levels that take a youth through the steps of selecting a dog, along with the basic skills for teaching a dog obedience and keeping it healthy. The advanced levels teach activities that the youth and their dog may participate in, such as dog show and agility competition. New Mexico’s 4-H Youth Development, which is endorsed by New Mexico State University’s Cooperative Extension Service, is funded and conducted by the volunteer parents and families from Dona Ana, Valencia, Quay and Chaves counties. The event is held annually in Albuquerque to help youth and their families to become familiar with the 4-H Dog Project. “The dog school is designed to promote responsible dog ownership,” said Linda Herrera, coordinator of the school. For 16 years, members of dog organizations from around the state have volunteered to teach the youth how to take command of their dogs with the simple words of “sit,” “stay” and “come.” This year, 33 youth from 12 counties ¬– and their dogs – gathered at the Bernalillo County Sheriff’s Posse Arena in Albuquerque for the three-day event. The school is filled with workshops, demonstrations and training times to help the youth develop a greater understanding of their dog and themselves as a team. “The first two days, we spend time with the kids, teaching them showmanship, obedience, rally-o and agility,” Herrera said. “We also have demonstrations of different varieties of dog uses, such as barn hunt dogs, where the dogs are trained to find rodents in barns. The New Mexico Correctional K-9 teams did a demonstration on how they work together with their human partners to find drugs and protect citizens.” Demonstrations are also given in grooming, Frisbee dogs, dancing dogs, earth dogs and herding dogs. The final day’s activity is a dog show, in which each youth is encouraged to show their dog. “This experience will prepare them for other opportunities to show their dog in county 4-H dog shows, state fair 4-H dog shows and, perhaps, American Kennel Shows,” Herrera said. Traditional 4-H projects involve livestock, from as large as steers to as small as rabbits, but the 4-H dog curriculum may be the type of project any family can accommodate. “Maybe all they want to do is to complete the project by becoming a more responsible pet owner for their pets around the house or in their neighborhood,” Herrera said. “The dog project is something they can handle.”

AFRICANIZED BEES AND OTHER HONEY BEES

AFRICANIZED BEES AND OTHER HONEY BEES By Woods Houghton Eddy County Agriculture Agent It’s that time of the year to reflect and review safety precaution involving all bees. Africanized bees are now part of our environment, like rattle snakes, cockroaches, and files, we have to learn to coexist with them and limit adverse interaction with these insects. I publish this news release every year in hope of reducing such incidents. Africanized bees are a much more aggressive honeybee than European bees which are domesticated to produce honey. Africanized are wild bees and are not predators of humans and other life forms. They do not hunt down people to harm them. They do react very aggressively to what they perceive as an attack on their hive. When they are swarming or when they are foraging for food they are not as aggressive as when they have established a hive nearby and are defending that hive. Their venom is no more poisonous then their European counter parts. However, when they react to defend their hive the number of bees responding will be 15 to 30 times as many and can number in the 10s of thousands. What should you do about the Africanized bee? Take some common sense precautions: Make a bee patrol around your home once or twice a week during swarming season (March to October). Listen for the sound of bees in the air. Persistent buzzing may mean a hive or swarm is nearby. This should be done prior to starting a lawn mower or other equipment. Lawn mowers and equipment with magneto ignition systems seem to irritate bees both African and domestic. A Bee-proof your home by filling in potential nesting sites such as tree cavities and holes in outside walls. Put screen on the top of rain spouts and over water meter boxes in the ground. Remove piles of trash and junk. If you discover a bee colony, don't disturb it. Find out who removes or destroys wild colonies in your area and report it to them. A list of pest control operators and beekeepers that have been trained to remove bees is available from the extension office. These businesses do charge for their services. The property owners where the bees are located are responsible for their removal. The fire department, the county vector control, and extension office do NOT remove hives unless it is an emergency, someone under attack. If you see a bee colony on public property notify the agency responsible for management of that property. If it is at a city park, call the city, if it is BLM land call the BLM etc. If attacked by honeybees, your best defense is to run away as fast as you can. Seek shelter immediately in a building, a car, or heavy brush. Protect your face and neck the best you can. Standing still and calm does not work with Africanized bees they are aggressive, domestic bees are different in this behavior. DO NOT SWAT or KILL BEES sting you or someone else. This will increase the ferocity of the attack. The major immediate danger is being stung on the face and neck causing swelling and collapsing of the air way. The average 150 pound person can take about 200 stings before the venom toxin is dangerous, but it only takes a few stings to cause swelling and blockage of the air passage. Protect your face and neck! If you are stung many times or have an allergic reaction seek medical attention immediately. If you observe someone being stung, and they are unable to run or seek shelter, call 911 and report it. If you go to rescue them with out protection you will be attacked as well. DO NOT CALL 911 to report bees unless it is life threatening. This is only for life threatening situations where a person is being stung or has been stung and is in shock, respiratory failure etc. If you are allergic to bee stings, or think you might be, consult you physician for the best precautions to take. More people probably will be stung by bees. These insects are established in Eddy County and will be apart of our ecosystem for now on. Some individuals may be stung hundreds of times in only a few moments. The Africanized bee’s killer reputation is greatly exaggerated, but it does have basis in fact. People have and will die from their attack. Most often the persons or animals that have died were not able to get away from the bees quickly. It does not have to greatly change the way people live and work and play. People in south and Central America have lived with this insect for several decades without great difficulty, but some people are injured every year. For more information Contact your Local County Extension office. Eddy County Extension Service, New Mexico State University is an equal opportunity/affirmative action employer and educator. All programs are available to everyone regardless of race, color, religion, sex, age, handicap, or national origin. New Mexico State University, U.S. Department of Agriculture, and the Eddy County Government Cooperating.

A man who was stung hundreds of times in a bee attack in western Arizona has died.

VALLE VISTA, Ariz. – A man who was stung hundreds of times in a bee attack in western Arizona has died. The Mohave County Sheriff's Office confirmed Friday that the man died Sunday at a hospital in Kingman. Authorities say the man was watching a property in Valle Vista, a community about 14 miles northeast of Kingman, June 12 when he was attacked by a hive of Africanized bees. He was stung between 500 and 1,000 times. Beekeeper Johnnie Hoeft, who was called to the scene, says the hive was inside an old tool cabinet in a shed. The Today's News-Herald in Lake Havasu City identified the victim as John Wade. Family friend Betty Crippin told the newspaper that Wade had suffered a heart attack after the bee attack.

South Texas Farmer Dies in Bee Attack Near Tractor

South Texas Farmer Dies in Bee Attack Near Tractor A South Texas farmer has died after being stung by hundreds of bees while using a tractor on a field near Rio Hondo. The San Benito Fire Department on Monday identified the victim as 53-year-old Rogelio Zuniga (roh-HEE'-lee-oh ZOO'-nee-guh). Fire Chief Raul Zuniga Jr. is a cousin of the victim. He says the attack happened Sunday afternoon. Rogelio Zuniga was using a disk on the field when the tractor hit an old concrete pipe meant for irrigation. The fire chief says the bees came from an opening in the pipe. The victim was dead at the scene. The fire chief says an exterminator was brought in to kill the bees and clear the pipe, which had 15 to 20 feet of honeycombs. AP

Monday, June 29, 2015

Do you sell landowner hunting permits?

BE AWARE! How many of you get Landowner permits? How many of you pay Gross Receipts tax on those permits? Outfitters and guides brought this up at their summer meeting this past week. I was not aware of it at all! Here is a question answer produced by them for their members (see attachment). I thought our members needed to be made aware of this. If you have any questions, please feel free to contact me. I think it’s safe to say, I sort of kind or understand what is going on and how to fix it. BUT, realize in a nut shell. If you get permits YOU are responsible for the Gross Receipt tax on that permit! The IRS is starting to do audits on this! Landowner Permits The rules and regulations that relate to landowner permits can be found in section 3.2.1.27 Part C of the Gross Receipts and Compensation Tax Act Regulations. You can view these regs. in their entirety HERE scroll to the bottom of page 13. The regulation states "Granting the right to hunt is the sale of a license to use - For purposes of this section, granting by a landowner to another, a right to access and hunt within the boundaries of the landowner’s real property is a license to use the real property. A license is a form of property as defined in Subsection J of Section 7-9-3 NMSA 1978 and the receipts from the sale of a license are subject to the gross receipts tax." In more understandable terms, what this means is the landowner is responsible for the Gross Receipts Tax on landowner permits period. Every landowner that is allocated a landowner hunting permit is required to register with NM Taxation and Revenue (get a CRS number) and pay GRT at, at least, the minimal interval (semi-annual). Even if that tax is $0 because they receive the applicable forms from the Outfitter or broker. This issue gets further complicated by anyone who purchases a landowner permit for re-sale. For example, if an Outfitter purchases a landowner permit from a landowner and then resells this permit as a part of a larger outfitted package, that Outfitter is responsible for the GRT on the entire package (unless the hunter pays for the guided portion and the landowner permit separately - meaning one check to Outfitter and one check to Landowner). There is no law against double taxation so in this instance both the Outfitter and the Landowner would theoretically be paying the GRT on the landowner permit. The way to avoid this "double taxation" is for the Outfitter to issue the Landowner a "non-taxable form" (NTTC Type 2 - A form that must only be issued once in your entire relationship with the landowner). Hence, every Outfitter that is buying landowner permits and reselling them as a packaged deal should be issuing the Landowner an NTTC Type 2 to exempt the Landowner from the GRT on their permits. If you are not doing this the landowner is NOT exempt from having to pay GRT and, assuming they are not paying GRT, could definitely be audited and fined for failure to pay GRT on their permits. However, please note that the Outfitter is not on the hook if the landowner refuses to pay the GRT. The Outfitter GRT is completely separate of the landowner. Issuing an NTTC Type 2 is simply a courtesy to the landowner. Additionally any Landowner who sells their permits to a third party broker (i.e. Cabelas, goHunt.com, Hunting Fool, etc...) should also be receiving an NTTC Type 2 from that broker to exempt them from the GRT on their permits. Equally, if one of these brokers sells the permit directly to a hunter, that broker is responsible to pay ALL of the GRT for that permit. And if the broker sells the permit to an Outfitter who then sells the permit to a hunter as a package, the Outfitter needs to issue an NTTC Type 2 to the broker (if they wish to avoid double taxation). The bottom line is the landowner is always the party required to pay the GRT on landowner permits. If they wish to avoid paying taxes on these permits they need to have whom ever they sell their permit to issue them an NTTC Type 2. Guides Guides are also responsible for the GRT of the sale of hunts which they guide. NM Taxation and Revenue is cracking down on this hard and everyone that shows income as an independent contractor will be subject to audit over the next several years. The only way for a Guide to be exempt from paying the GRT on the income he receives from the Outfitter is for the Outfitter to issue the Guide a "non-taxable form" (NTTC Type 5 - A form that must only be issued once in your entire relationship with the guide). What this means is that every Guide needs to be registered with NM Taxation and Revenue and have them issue the Guide a CRS number. Than the Outfitter must issue the Guide and NTTC Type 5. Conclusion Most Outfitters should be issuing two types of NTTC forms. One for each relationship they have with a landowner and another for each relationship they have with their guides. A type 2 to the Landowner, for the purchase of the landowner permit and a type 5, to the Guide, for their services. Kerrie C. Romero Executive Director - New Mexico Council of Outfitters and Guides 51 Bogan Rd Stanley, NM 87056 (505) 440-5258 (www.nmoutfitters.com)

APHIS Releases Partial Epidemiology Report on Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza

APHIS Releases Partial Epidemiology Report on Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza June 15, 2015 – The United States Department of Agriculture’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) today released an epidemiology report outlining its initial findings through June 5 about how highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) was likely entering new premises during this period of time. After conducting investigations on over 80 commercial poultry farms, APHIS analysis indicates that there are likely several ways the virus could be transmitted, including lapses in biosecurity practices and environmental factors. APHIS cannot, however, associate HPAI transmission with one factor or group of factors in a statistically significant way at this time, and will continue to update this report regularly as more analyses are completed. APHIS scientists believe wild birds were responsible for introducing HPAI into commercial poultry. While wild birds are the original pathway for the virus’ introduction into the United States, it appears the virus was spreading in other ways as well, given the number and proximity of farms affected by HPAI. For instance, the report provides evidence that a certain cluster of farms was affected by identical viruses, pointing to possible transmission among those farms. In addition, genetic analyses of the HPAI viruses suggest that independent introductions as well as transmission between farms were occurring in several States concurrently. For example, APHIS has observed the following: sharing of equipment between an infected and non-infected farm; employees moving between infected and non-infected farms; lack of cleaning and disinfection of vehicles moving between farms; and reports of rodents or small wild birds inside the poultry houses. APHIS is compiling these practices and will present these findings in a subsequent update of this report. Based on an analysis by APHIS, environmental factors may also play a part in transmitting HPAI. APHIS found that air samples collected outside of infected poultry houses contain virus particles, indicating that the virus could be transmitted by air. In addition, preliminary analysis of wind data shows a relationship between sustained high winds and an increase in the number of infected farms approximately 5 days later. APHIS is conducting additional analyses to better characterize environmental factors that may contribute to virus spread. … …

Enrollment for 2016 Dairy Margin Protection Program to Begin July 1

Enrollment for 2016 Dairy Margin Protection Program to Begin July 1 06/29/2015 02:53 PM EDT Enrollment for 2016 Dairy Margin Protection Program to Begin July 1 PORTLAND, June 29, 2015 — Agriculture Deputy Secretary Krysta Harden today announced that starting July 1, 2015, dairy farmers can enroll in the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) Margin Protection Program for coverage in 2016. The voluntary program, established by the 2014 Farm Bill, provides financial assistance to participating dairy operations when the margin – the difference between the price of milk and feed costs – falls below the coverage level selected by the farmer. Harden made the announcement while visiting Wolfe’s Neck Farm and dairy school in Freeport, Maine. "More than half of our nation’s dairy producers enrolled in the 2015 program, which exceeded our expectations for the first year of the program," said Harden. "We are confident that dairy farmers across the country will again take advantage of this safety net program for 2016. USDA will continue outreach efforts, including partnering with cooperative extension services, to ensure dairy producers are fully informed about the protections that this safety net program can provide during periods of market downturns.” The Margin Protection Program gives participating dairy producers the flexibility to select coverage levels best suited for their operation. Enrollment begins July 1 and ends on Sept. 30, 2015, for coverage in 2016. Participating farmers will remain in the program through 2018 and pay a $100 administrative fee each year. Producers also have the option of selecting a different coverage level during open enrollment each year. Margin Protection Program payments are based on an operation’s historical production. An operation’s historical production will increase by 2.61 percent in 2016 if the operation participated in 2015, providing a stronger safety net. USDA also has an online resource available to help dairy producers decide which level of coverage will provide them with the strongest safety net under a variety of conditions. The enhanced Web tool, available at www.fsa.usda.gov/mpptool, allows dairy farmers to quickly and easily combine their unique operation data and other key variables to calculate their coverage needs based on price projections. Producers can also review historical data or estimate future coverage based on data projections. The secure site can be accessed via computer, mobile phone, or tablet, 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Dairy operations enrolling in the program must meet conservation compliance provisions. Producers participating in the Livestock Gross Margin insurance program may register for the Margin Protection Program, but this new margin program will only begin once their Livestock dairy insurance coverage has ended. Producers must also submit form CCC-782 for 2016, confirming their Margin Protection Program coverage level selection, to the local Farm Service Agency (FSA) office. If electing higher coverage for 2016, dairy producers can either pay the premium in full at the time of enrollment or pay a minimum of 25 percent of the premium by Feb. 1, 2016. The Margin Protection Program was established by the 2014 Farm Bill, which builds on historic economic gains in rural America over the past six years, while achieving meaningful reform and billions of dollars in savings for the taxpayer. Since enactment, USDA has made significant progress to implement each provision of this critical legislation, including providing disaster relief to farmers and ranchers; strengthening risk management tools; expanding access to rural credit; funding critical research; establishing innovative public-private conservation partnerships; developing new markets for rural-made products; and investing in infrastructure, housing and community facilities to help improve quality of life in rural America. For more information, visit www.usda.gov/farmbill. For more information, visit FSA online at www.fsa.usda.gov/dairy for more information, or stop by a local FSA office to learn more about the Margin Protection Program. To find a local FSA office in your area, visit http://offices.usda.gov. USDA is an equal opportunity provider and employer. To file a complaint of discrimination, write: USDA, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Civil Rights, Office of Adjudication, 1400 Independence Ave., SW, Washington, DC 20250-9410 or call (866) 632-9992 (Toll-free Customer Service), (800) 877-8339 (Local or Federal relay), (866) 377-8642 (Relay voice users).

Are you a beginning or small-scale farmer? Are you producing for organic or local markets? From NM State FSA office

Are you a beginning or small-scale farmer? Are you producing for organic or local markets? Do you work for an organization that represents any of these producer types? Please join a call on Monday, June 29th at 3pm Eastern to learn about the process, timeline and criteria for nomination to the Farm Service Agency (FSA) County Committees. The call will also include a panel of current FSA committee members who will share their experience and answer questions. Panel Speakers: 1. FSA State Committee Iowa – Specialty Crop - Mr. Matt Russell 2. FSA County Committee Maine – Dairy - Ms. Amy Rowbottom 3. FSA County Committee Texas – Beef Cattle - Mrs. Cather Woods The call will be on Monday, June 29th at 3pm EST. The conference call number is: 888-844-9904. Participant Code is: 4804675 Nationwide, there are approximately 7,800 farmers and ranchers serving on FSA county committees, and your participation is a great way to get connected to the agricultural community and help make important decisions. The nomination form and other information about FSA county committee elections are available on the FSA elections website. Questions? Please contact Matt Pavone. Veronica L. Tribbet SED Secretary Office of the State Executive Director Farm Service Agency United States Department of Agriculture 6200 Jefferson St., NE Suite 211 Albuquerque, NM 87109 (505) 761-4900 (p) (877) 450-0860 (f) veronica.tribbet@nm.usda.gov

COW/CALF CORNER

COW/CALF CORNER The Newsletter From the Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service June 29, 2015 Meat prices and production Derrell S. Peel, Oklahoma State University Extension Livestock Marketing Specialist The latest retail meat price data for May shows Choice beef prices at $6.412/lb., up one cent from April and 8.4 percent higher than one year ago. The All-Fresh retail beef price was 2.2 cents higher than last month at $6.059/lb., up 10.8 percent year over year. Retail pork price in May was $3.696/lb., down 7.3 cents from April and 9.8 percent lower than one year ago. The May broiler composite retail price was $1.932/lb., down 6.6 cents from last month and 0.7 percent lower than one year ago. Higher retail beef prices and lower pork and broiler prices in May follow from decreased beef production and increased pork and broiler production. Beef production for the year to date through May was 4.7 percent lower than one year ago while pork production for the same period was up 5.6 percent and broiler production was up 3.9 percent. The underlying supply conditions notwithstanding, there continues to be surprise at the apparent lack of substitution between beef and the other meats, in terms of retail prices. Retail price ratios in May pushed to higher record levels for beef relative to pork and broilers. May retail beef prices were 3.14 times retail broiler prices, a new record beef-broiler retail price ratio and the sixth consecutive month with a ratio at 3 or higher. The beef to pork retail price ratio advanced to 1.64 in May, a new record level and the sixth consecutive month with a ratio of 1.5 or higher. The latest Hog and Pig report indicates that hog production is near a peak currently and pork supplies will large through the remainder of the year, perhaps tapering off a bit going into 2016. Pork production is expected to be up roughly 5 percent year over year in 2015 and will likely increase but more modestly in 2016. Likewise, broiler production is expected to be up 5 percent in 2015 compared to last year and will continue increasing at a slower pace in 2016. Beef production will likely remain down year over year for the remainder of the year but may begin to increase year over year in 2016. Beef production may be down roughly 2 percent in 2015 compared to 2014 levels. In the meantime, it appears that retail beef prices will depend less on pork and poultry supplies than on continued tight beef supplies.

Thursday, June 25, 2015

New Mexico State Forestry Conservation Seedling Program

New Mexico State Forestry Conservation Seedling Program WELCOME! Spring 2015 Distribution has ended. Ordering for fall 2015 will begin July 6, 2015 and end on October 9, 2015. Distribution of orders will be September 14 through October 16, 2015. For more than 40 years the Division has offered low cost seedlings to landowners to plant for reforestation, erosion control, windbreaks, or Christmas tree plantations. Since 1960, more than four million trees have been planted throughout New Mexico that were purchased through this program. The Forestry Division offers over 50 different species for sale over the course of the fall and spring sales. These seedlings are sold in small containers, large containers and bare root. Please note all containerized species are offered in the fall and bare root species and any remaining containerized species are offered in the spring. We switched to this schedule because it has been shown that fall is a highly successful time to plant containerized seedlings. Plants have time to establish roots over the winter while dormant before putting on top growth in the spring and as an added bonus the weather is better for planting. Select your shipping or pickup date so that you can plant your seedlings five to six weeks before your area of the state starts having hard freeze days. For questions about prices and minimum order size refer to ordering information

Looming hunger demands more ag research

Iowa State University President Steven Leath shared the following message on the national stage last week: Congress must increase spending on U.S. agricultural research now to have a fighting chance to feed the projected 9.5 billion people in 2050. Leath presented the 2015 Charles Valentine Riley Memorial Lecture in Washington, D.C. June 16 for the American Association for the Advancement of Science. The Charles Valentine Riley Memorial Foundation (RMF) released a new report summarizing a discussion among leaders of universities, university associations and others on the need for reversing an alarming lack of federal investment in food, agricultural and natural resources research. To find the news release: Looming hunger demands more ag research https://shar.es/1q2cR5 The complete report can be found at: Pursuing a Unifying Message http://rileymemorial.org/ Jim Libbin Associate Dean and Director of Academic Programs College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences New Mexico State University 575-646-1120

Wednesday, June 24, 2015

What are the best ways to control algae in water tanks?

By: Brian Beer, Area Livestock Agent, Clemson University
RELATED CONTENT How do I get rid of algae in my nurse tank? 5/16/2013 8:24:00 AM Algal Blooms Pose Danger to Livestock 8/11/2014 9:34:00 AM During the hot summer month algae can become a problem in livestock water tanks. Some species of algae can be toxic to livestock. Most are just an unsightly nuisance. There are some tactics that can be used to eliminate the problem. Periodically cleaning the tank to reduce nutrients can slow algae growth. This is easier said than done in some cases. Most commercial tanks have a drain that allows for easy water removal. Cattlemen often recycle, reuse, and find new uses for any vessel that holds water. Old bath tubs, half of a septic tank that didn’t have quite enough concrete to complete, barge pontoons cut in half, have all found new life as water tanks on farms throughout the southeast. Removing water from these items may be difficult. Treating tanks with products that kill algae is another option. Copper and chlorine are two good and readily available options. Copper sulfate is used as an algicide in farm ponds and can be used in watering tanks. You can find commercially available liquid copper sulfate in small bottles that are sold as stock tank cleaners. You can also by copper sulfate crystals and make your own. The chart below gives mixing instruction for dissolving copper sulfate crystals in warm water to give 1 part per million copper in a specific size water tank. Apply every 2-4 weeks as needed. cusulfatechart Using copper sulfate in systems with metal pipes may increase deterioration of the metal over time and some livestock, such as sheep, cannot tolerate high levels of copper
. Keep added copper levels to a minimum to reduce the chance of toxicity and to maximize the life span of metal pipes. Using unscented chlorine bleach is another option to reduce algae growth. Adding 2 to 3 oz. of chlorine bleach for each 50 gallons of water capacity to the tank each week will reduce the algae problems. Copper sulfate or chlorine applications do not require livestock to be kept away from the tank, but best results are obtained if the active ingredient concentration is maintained for at least 5 minutes. Withholding livestock access for that amount of time may achieve better results. http://aces.nmsu.edu/pubs/_w/w-103/welcome.html Also see NMSU http://aces.nmsu.edu/pubs/_w/w-103/welcome.html

Tuesday, June 23, 2015

New NMSU Extension Publicaioins

The following CES publications have been revised and are now available online in PDF format. Guide B-819, “Mesquite Control: Aerial Application,” revised by Keith Duncan and Kirk McDaniel http://aces.nmsu.edu/pubs/_b/B819.pdf Guide E-326, "Home Canned Sweet Spreads Made with Green Chile,” by Lisa McKee http://aces.nmsu.edu/pubs/_e/E326.pdf

USDA Announces New Tool to Monitor Dams, Keep Communities Safe

WASHINGTON, June 23, 2015 - Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack today announced the availability of DamWatch, a new web-based application that provides real-time monitoring of rainfall, snowmelt, stream flow and seismic events that could pose potential threats to dam safety. "With tools like this, USDA is using the newest technologies to meet our mission," Vilsack said. "This tool provides a 'one-stop' source for accessing critical documents, databases, onsite electronic monitoring devices and geospatial information. The intent is to help keep the public safe and protect infrastructure." Through a secure interactive web interface, DamWatch will help watershed project sponsors monitor and manage dams that were built with assistance from USDA's Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS). By monitoring these structures, project sponsors can better prevent and protect against hazardous, costly and potentially catastrophic events. For example, during recent rainfall events in Oklahoma, NRCS worked with project sponsors to prioritize field reconnaissance of structure sites. DamWatch offers project sponsors an effective way to manage watershed projects. It alerts personnel via email, fax or text message when dams experience one or more potentially hazardous conditions, resulting in the coordinated deployment of personnel and resources at the right time and place. Although NRCS personnel may elect to receive DamWatch alerts, the project sponsor is responsible for monitoring the dams and notifying authorities during an emergency. NRCS may be available to assist the project sponsor at the sponsor's request. During record rainfalls last month in Oklahoma, Texas, Kansas, Missouri and other parts of the central plains, nearly 1,000 DamWatch alerts helped NRCS personnel focus their response efforts. NRCS personnel assisted project sponsors in reviewing the condition of hundreds of dams throughout the region. NRCS watershed projects provide an estimated $2.2 billion each year to local communities. Nearly 12,000 dams in 47 states and Puerto Rico help to prevent flooding and erosion damage, provide recreational opportunities, improve water supply and create habitat for wildlife. DamWatch, which was developed for NRCS by USEngineering Solutions Corporation, is currently monitoring nearly 12,000 dams across the country. For more information visit www.nrcs.usda.gov/GetStarted or a local USDA service center. #

Thursday, June 18, 2015

Extension Symposium: Value of Low Stress Livestock Handling in Livestock Production Practices*

Extension Symposium: Value of Low Stress Livestock Handling in Livestock Production Practices* June 25, 2015, Thursday Ruidoso Convention Center, Ruidoso, New Mexico • 12:00 – 1:00 PM LUNCH (Provided) Sponsored by New Mexico Beef Council, Opening Comments by Dina Chac√≥n-Reitzel, Executive Director • 1:00 – 1:30 Addressing Animal Welfare and Low Stress Livestock Handling Dr. Temple Grandin, Professor of Animal Sciences, Colorado State University • 1:30 – 2:20 Principles of Low Stress Stockmanship Mr. Guy Glosson, Mesquite Grove Ranch, Jayton, TX • 2:20 – 2:25 Introduction by Dr. John Paterson, National Cattlemen’s Beef Association Producer Education • 2:25 - 2:55 Managing a Successful Feedyard BQA and Animal Care Program: Lessons Learned, Challenges and Opportunities Mr. Ben Weinheimer, Vice President, TX Cattle Feeders Association • BREAK 2:55 – 3:15 PM • 3:15 – 3:35 Extension Programming in South Dakota to Improve Livestock Handling Dr. Ken Olson, Extension Beef Specialist, South Dakota State University • 3:35 – 3:55 Teaching Stockmanship Across the Generations Mr. Billy Whitehurst, Extension Agent, Madison-Jefferson Counties, Whitehall, MT, Montana State University • 3:55 – 4:15 Stewardship and Stockmanship: Increasing Awareness of Beef Quality Assurance in Idaho Dr. Benton Glaze & Dr. John Hall, Extension Beef Cattle Specialists, University of Idaho • 4:15 – 5:00 Roundtable Discussion: Future Topics and Format for the WSASAS Extension Symposium Everyone present participating, Dr. Jim Sprinkle, University of AZ, moderator Due to strong industry support by the sponsors listed below, we are able to provide this Symposium at a reduced rate of only $25 for each attendee (including lunch). To register for this Symposium, please log on https://www.asas.org/membership-services/asas-sections/western-section/meetings by clicking Registration. You will either need to enter your existing registration or Create a New Visitor Registration. After logging in, you will see an option for “Extension Symposium” with the same fee listed for both members and nonmembers. The host hotel for this convention will be the Lodge at Sierra Blanca and it is within walking distance of the Convention Center. Total fees for the basic room at the Lodge is $131/night (using the meeting code WSASA15). Information about the WSASAS Annual Meeting is available at https://www.asas.org/membership-services/asas-sections/western-section/meetings . Please contact Jim Sprinkle at sprinkle@ag.arizona.edu or 928-970-0589 for questions regarding this symposium.

In 2005, trichomoniasis became a reportable disease in New Mexico

In 2005, trichomoniasis became a reportable disease in New Mexico. And that, according to John Wenzel, New Mexico State University (NMSU) Extension DVM, is one of the best things that could have happened in controlling the venereal disease that’s resurged throughout cattle country in recent years. Focusing the industry’s attention on the disease is a good start, he says, but truly controlling it takes an aggressive bull-testing effort. That’s because when a bull becomes chronically infected, he never clears the disease. Cows, on the other hand, can become infected when bred by an infected bull, but later clear the disease and return to normal estrus. What’s more, because the organism lives in the uterus, it’s very difficult to collect samples from cows. In bulls, on the other hand, the organism lives on the penis surface, making collection and sampling easier. Trich’s effect on a cowherd can be disastrous, Wenzel says. When an infected bull breeds a cow, he deposits the organism in her reproductive tract, where it flourishes and can infect other bulls. The organism causes the cow to abort or reabsorb the fetus, which usually happens in the first 60 days of pregnancy. After the cow returns to normal estrus, she’ll usually clear the infection in 3-5 heat cycles. If she’s bred again, she’ll usually carry that calf to term. So, the only real way to diagnose the disease is to test the bulls, he stresses. And it’s something ranchers might want to consider, even if their calving season and weaning percentages are within the guardrails. “One of my ranches this spring finally decided they wanted to do a little trich testing,” Wenzel says. Of the 54 mature bulls tested; one came back positive. But, of the 15 heifer bulls, four were positive. The rancher didn’t have any reason to test those latter bulls, Wenzel says. After all, he had a 95% conception rate in his heifers and there were no apparent problems. “What we determined was that exposure took place at the very end or maybe after his breeding season was over.” They retested the bulls after this year’s breeding season and everything came back negative. “But what if he hadn’t tested? He had five bulls, basically 4% of his bull battery, that were positive. Had he not tested, he’d likely had 15-18% more open cows this fall when he palpated. How much money would that cost him?” he asks. Quite a bit, it turns out. According to an NMSU economic analysis, using information that Wenzel provided when he was still in private practice, his clients had a net return of about $72/cow exposed with trich testing. The herd with an early diagnosis of trich – when 10-12% of the bulls tested positive – suffered a net loss of $35/cow exposed. Those herds with a chronic infection – 30% or more positive bulls – had a net loss of $185/cow exposed. “So what should you do? It’s simple. You need to test your bulls before you turn them out,” Wenzel says. Then test them again when you pull them off. “If you test when you pull the bulls off, not only have you tested the bulls, but you just tested your cows. Because if your bulls are negative, you know all your cows are negative.” And, Wenzel says, even if you do have a positive bull, culling open cows may not be necessary, assuming you have the ability to carry them over. “I’m not sure that culling open cows is the thing to do, especially young opens,” he says. “It’s really difficult to get a cow acclimated to this part of the country (New Mexico). We know that 97% of those cows will clear the infection with sexual rest. Why not separate them and give that 97% a chance to recover?” Wenzel has done that with success. “What I’ve done is segregate those opens, vaccinate them, and turn cull bulls on them that we know are negative. If the bulls happen to pick it up, they’re going to the sale anyhow. But historically, if we treat those cows that way, we get better than 90% conception.” Wenzel says trich isn’t an individual ranch problem, because nobody can keep a bull home. “But if you’ll test and get rid of the positive bulls, and give sexual rest to your cows, we can control this disease pretty darn well.”

Trichomoniasis Prevention

This article is based upon Colorado State University Extension Service: http://www.ext.colostate.edu/pubs/livestk/01628.pdf I am getting a lot of reports about trichinosis (Trich.) around the county again. I have worked with a couple of producers and their veterinarian who have had this disease in their herd. It can and is devastating. One herd had only a 10% conception rate. Trich is a protozoan organism, so it is a parasite. It is transmitted by sexual contact during mating so it is a parasitic Sexual Transmuted Disease, (STD). You can not know if your cattle are infested until you have a veterinarian test. Risk factors are: Bulls exposure from neighboring pasture cattle, Cow exposure from neighboring pastures of cattle if you have a closed herd. Exposure of herd from bring in untested bulls. Retaining open cow into the next breeding season. Background The parasite lives in the sheath of the bull penis and in the re protective track of the cow. When the cow becomes infected from a Bull the infections can cause the cow to be infertile, she will cycle again and again until she builds up immunity. Unfortunately immunity is short and she can be reinfected. The cow can settle but will abort early usually first 3 months or so and goes back into heat. She can go full term and remain infected and shed the infective Trich parasite after calving. Bulls will show no signs of the Disease and will be source of infection until dead. ONLY WAY TO WIN! Is to work with you veterinarian; your adjoining ranches and develop a compressive Integrated Disease Management Plan. (IDMP)

Poor control of common lambsquarters with glyphosate: El Passo Extension IPM Agent

Poor control of common lambsquarters with glyphosate: On June 16, I inspected a cotton field southwest of Fabens with poor weed control after 2 applications of Roundup PowerMAX®. Both applications were made with a spray mixture of 15 gal/acre (using a 300-gallon tank), a spray width covering 18 cotton rows, and adding the non-ionic oil concentrate Penetrator®Plus at 1%. The first application was made on June 1, 2015 using 32 oz of Roundup PowerMAX®/acre. After observing poor weed control, a second application was made on June 9 using 48 oz of Roundup PowerMAX®/acre. Now (over two weeks after the first application), most weed species are dead, but approximately 10-15% of common lambsquarters plants, also known as Goosefoot in the plant family Chenopodiaceae, are doing well. Following suggestions by Dr. Charles Allen, I used RTU RoundUp to spray two herbicide rates in two rows. The first row received a “light” application and the second row received a “heavy” spray (soaking the plants well to the point of runoff). I returned to the field one and two days after treatment and I noticed herbicide-damaged cotton plants adjacent to the handsprayed lambsquarters. These weeds appeared undisturbed while the cotton leaves showed herbicide damage. It is too early to make any conclusions, but I will continue visiting this field and evaluate alternatives. Dr. Peter Dotray, Professor of Weed Science with Joint Appointment at Texas A&M Agrilife Research & Extension Service and Texas Tech University, indicated that broadleaf weed control in cotton is difficult, but it is possible to use Staple herbicides when weeds are small and being mindful of crop rotation restrictions. Also, the Liberty herbicide may be used in Liberty Link cotton varieties. Another possibility is the use of hooded sprayers with herbicides such as: Aim, ET, Liberty, or Gramoxone. Ultimately, in some cases, cultivation and hand hoeing may be the best options. I observed a mixture of dead, dying, and live common lambsquarter plants; which to me would suggest the possibility of a glyphosate resistance problem. However, there has not been a documented case of lambsquarter resistance to glyphosate anywhere in the world. We may be dealing with naturally reduced glyphosate susceptibility in these lambsquarter plants. Later in the season, I would like to obtain lambsquarters seeds, from this field, and send to Dr. Dotray for glyphosate-resistance studies. The extension publication “4-step Program for Managing Glyphosate Resistant Pigweeds in Texas Cotton” offers great advice on glyphosate resistance management (click here).

Monday, June 15, 2015

APHIS Releases Partial Epidemiology Report on Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza

June 15, 2015 – The United States Department of Agriculture’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) today released an epidemiology report outlining its initial findings through June 5 about how highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) was likely entering new premises during this period of time. After conducting investigations on over 80 commercial poultry farms, APHIS analysis indicates that there are likely several ways the virus could be transmitted, including lapses in biosecurity practices and environmental factors. APHIS cannot, however, associate HPAI transmission with one factor or group of factors in a statistically significant way at this time, and will continue to update this report regularly as more analyses are completed. APHIS scientists believe wild birds were responsible for introducing HPAI into commercial poultry. While wild birds are the original pathway for the virus’ introduction into the United States, it appears the virus was spreading in other ways as well, given the number and proximity of farms affected by HPAI. For instance, the report provides evidence that a certain cluster of farms was affected by identical viruses, pointing to possible transmission among those farms. In addition, genetic analyses of the HPAI viruses suggest that independent introductions as well as transmission between farms were occurring in several States concurrently. For example, APHIS has observed the following: sharing of equipment between an infected and noninfected farm; employees moving between infected and noninfected farms; lack of cleaning and disinfection of vehicles moving between farms; and reports of rodents or small wild birds inside the poultry houses. APHIS is compiling these practices and will present these findings in a subsequent update of this report. Based on an analysis by APHIS, environmental factors may also play a part in transmitting HPAI. APHIS found that air samples collected outside of infected poultry houses contain virus particles, indicating that the virus could be transmitted by air. In addition, preliminary analysis of wind data shows a relationship between sustained high winds and an increase in the number of infected farms approximately 5 days later. APHIS is conducting additional analyses to better characterize environmental factors that may contribute to virus spread. While USDA has always worked with States and industry to promote biosecurity, it has continued to step up this collaboration throughout the outbreak, including meeting with industry representatives, producers, and federal, state and local government officials on to discuss the importance of biosecurity. Moving forward, APHIS plans to continue sharing what it learns with State and industry partners through regular conversations and meetings, including an Industry/USDA/State Animal Health Meeting in July where the agency will focus specifically on biosecurity. In addition, APHIS will continue to regularly communicate with its partners about all HPAI issues, hosting monthly calls with State agriculture officials, weekly calls with industry and State veterinary officials, and daily calls with officials in HPAIaffected States. APHIS appreciates the cooperation of poultry producers in providing the information needed for these epidemiology investigations. APHIS values its partnership with industry and believes that with their continued support and assistance, the agency will be well positioned to learn all it can about this virus. USDA plans to issue regular progress reports on its Web site to share updated findings with States, industry, and stakeholders.

National Hay Assoication Request

Please give the following your attention and call Randall Hughes, 903.748.2491, to discuss how you can help: Greetings from your fellow NHA members Randall and Sue Hughes in Texarkana! I am sure by now you are well aware of the flooding that is going on around the Red River in Texas, Arkansas and Louisiana. We are far enough from the river that our land has not been flooded but our fellow cattle raisers in our county, Miller County, Arkansas, and adjoining county, Bowie County, Texas, have had to move their cattle to higher ground. There have not been enough empty pastures to accommodate all the displaced cattle so there is an urgent need for hay. Since this area has received way over the normal amount of precipitation from February through May, there is not any 2015 hay available and not much 2014 hay left. Randall asked me to email you and see if you thought this might be an opportunity for the NHA to help in this relief effort. Some hay producers outside our area are going to make donations through hay at reduced cost. Would you please give Randall a call at 903.748.2491 to discuss possible NHA involvement? Thanks so much, Randall and Sue Hughes Rockin WH Hay Co. Texarkana, AR Ph: 903.748.2491

USDA Opens Enrollment Period for Agriculture Risk Coverage and Price Loss Coverage Safety-Net Programs 06/15/2015 02:13 PM EDT

USDA Opens Enrollment Period for Agriculture Risk Coverage and Price Loss Coverage Safety-Net Programs WASHINGTON, June 15, 2015 – U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Secretary Tom Vilsack today announced that eligible producers may now formally enroll in the Agriculture Risk Coverage (ARC) and Price Loss Coverage (PLC) programs for 2014 and 2015. The enrollment period begins June 17, 2015, and will end Sept. 30, 2015. "The extensive outreach campaign conducted by USDA since the 2014 Farm Bill was enacted, along with extending deadlines, is central to achieving an expected high level of participation,” said Vilsack. “We worked with universities to simplify these complex programs by providing online tools so producers could explore how program election options would affect their operation in different market conditions; these tools were presented to almost 3,000 organizations across the country. The Farm Service Agency also sent more than 5 million educational notices to producers nationwide and participated in over 4,880 educational events with more than 447,000 attendees. I am proud of the many committed USDA employees who worked hard over the last several months to provide producers support to help them make these important decisions.” The new programs, established by the 2014 Farm Bill, trigger financial protections for agricultural producers when market forces cause substantial drops in crop prices or revenues. More than 1.76 million farmers have elected ARC or PLC. Previously, 1.7 million producers had enrolled to receive direct payments (the program replaced with ARC and PLC by the 2014 Farm Bill). This means more farms have elected ARC or PLC than previously enrolled under previously administered programs. Nationwide, 96 percent of soybean farms, 91 percent of corn farms, and 66 percent of wheat farms elected ARC. 99 percent of long grain rice farms, 99 percent of peanut farms, and 94 percent of medium grain rice farms elected PLC. For data about other crops and state-by-state program election results go to www.fsa.usda.gov/arc-plc. Covered commodities under ARC and PLC include barley, canola, large and small chickpeas, corn, crambe, flaxseed, grain sorghum, lentils, mustard seed, oats, peanuts, dry peas, rapeseed, long grain rice, medium grain rice (which includes short grain and sweet rice), safflower seed, sesame, soybeans, sunflower seed and wheat. Upland cotton is no longer a covered commodity. The 2014 Farm Bill builds on historic economic gains in rural America over the past six years, while achieving meaningful reform and billions of dollars in savings for the taxpayer. Since enactment, the U.S. Department of Agriculture has made significant progress to implement each provision of this critical legislation, including providing disaster relief to farmers and ranchers; strengthening risk management tools; expanding access to rural credit; funding critical research; establishing innovative public-private conservation partnerships; developing new markets for rural-made products; and investing in infrastructure, housing and community facilities to help improve quality of life in rural America. For more information, visit www.usda.gov/farmbill. # USDA is an equal opportunity provider and employer. To file a complaint of discrimination, write: USDA, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Civil Rights, Office of Adjudication, 1400 Independence Ave., SW, Washington, DC 20250-9410 or call (866) 632-9992 (Toll-free Customer Service), (800) 877-8339 (Local or Federal relay), (866) 377-8642 (Relay voice users).

Wednesday, June 10, 2015

Range Grasshoper meeting June 22

In cooperation with area County Extension Offices, we will host an informational meeting on range grasshoppers June 22 from 2-4 p.m. Shawn Carson, USDA-APHIS Plant Protection & Quarantine will be available on June 22 from 2:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. at the Southwest Center for Rangeland Sustainability in Corona to provide an update on statewide grasshopper population estimates and trends, as well as, provide further information and answer questions related to species found in the area, forage loss calculations and RAAT application (Reduced Area Agent Treatments) for risk management. Please join us if you can! Please reply to this email if you think you might attend to help us guesstimate attendance for to make sure we have plenty of handout information available for everyone, but a reply is certainly not necessary to attend. Attached is a flyer, announcing the afternoons program. Shad Shad H. Cox, Superintendent/Programs Operations Director Corona Range and Livestock Research Center & Southwest Center for Rangeland Sustainability Animal and Range Sciences Agricultural Experiment Station College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences New Mexico State University P.O. Box 392 Corona, New Mexico 88318 575.849.1015 office 575-849.1021 fax www.corona.nmsu.edu Facebook: /nmsucorona

Monday, June 8, 2015

Chile-peddling NMSU business grads have farming roots that run deep

DATE: 06/08/2015 WRITER: Amanda Bradford, 575-646-1996, ambradfo@nmsu.edu CONTACT: Preston Mitchell, 575-267-2246, admin@hatch-green-chile.com Chile is big business in New Mexico – growers in the state produced 65,000 tons of chile in 2013, worth $49.5 million – and nowhere is it bigger than the Hatch Valley, where some of the region’s longstanding farming families have been raising the crop for nearly a century. Second-generation New Mexico State University alum Preston Mitchell comes from one of those farming families – his great-grandfather, Joseph Franzoy, is widely credited with being the Hatch Valley’s first chile farmer, coming to the region in the early 1920s. Another branch of his family tree is great-grandfather Ed Berridge, who started Berridge Farms in 1944. And while Preston and his wife, Elaine Mitchell – herself a third-generation Aggie with family ties to agriculture in the region – recently earned their bachelor’s and master’s degrees from the College of Business and are working full-time with successful financial firms, they’re also carrying on the family chile tradition. The young entrepreneurs own and operate the Hatch Chile Store, a chile e-commerce site, and recently acquired the fresh and frozen online sales portions of Biad Chili Products. They also opened a processing facility and storefront on West Picacho Avenue in August 2014. The facility is closed and quiet now, but was abuzz with some 30 seasonal employees during the peak of the chile harvesting and processing season last fall. Buying Biad’s operation was a big scaling-up for the Mitchells. “We went from processing a few thousand pounds of product to processing tens of thousands of pounds of product overnight,” Preston said. “It was a big jump – but we’re hoping to grow through acquisition again in the next few years.” Most of their chile comes from Berridge Farms, along with a few other growers in the Hatch Valley. They ship the prized peppers all over the country, often to transplants who’ve moved away from New Mexico, but still need their fall chile fix. Elaine said it’s a lot of work, but it’s a business they really love. “It’s really fun, and we use so many of our skills that we learned at NMSU and from our parents,” she said. “It’s a great business and something that people love, so it’s really easy to sell our product.” It’s also a business that allows them to embark on their careers in financial services. With her bachelor’s and master’s degrees in accounting under her belt, Elaine is working as a staff accountant with local firm Beasley, Mitchell & Co. After earning bachelor’s degrees in management and accounting and information systems, as well as a master’s in accounting, Preston is working as an auditor with KPMG, a top national firm. Before the ink was dry on their degrees, the couple was looking for ways to give back to NMSU. In October, they visited with the College of Business ambassador group to encourage them to explore their business ideas now. “We talked about becoming entrepreneurs in college and not waiting,” Elaine said. “A lot of students have great ideas and they might not follow through with them because it’s scary. But it’s actually a great time to try something.” The pair is also contributing a portion of their proceeds from the Hatch Chile Store to NMSU’s Chile Pepper Institute in support of the research being done there and the resources the institute offers to businesses like theirs. “They’re working on solving the disease problems that the industry struggles with,” Preston said. “They’re making strains that are more resistant to disease and more consistent in flavor, heat level, size and even how quickly the peppers peel.” Eventually, the Mitchells hope to set up a scholarship or contribute to some of the funds they benefited from during their time at NMSU. Learn more about the Hatch Chile Store at www.hatch-green-chile.com.

New Mexico Agricultural Leadership program recruiting new group

Over the last 14 years the NM Ag Leadership (NMAL) program has served New Mexico by identifying and providing leadership development opportunities to more than 90 men and women in the food, agriculture and natural resource industries so they could become stronger and more effective in their industries and communities. Be one of New Mexico’s strongest leaders by joining NMAL.They are presently recruiting participants for the 11th class scheduled to begin in November 2015. Download the application packet at http://aces.nmsu.edu/nmal/application.html and submit it via email or regular mail by Aug. 20.

Farm Service Agency County Committee Nomination Period Begins June 15

Farm Service Agency County Committee Nomination Period Begins June 15 06/08/2015 10:35 AM EDT Farm Service Agency County Committee Nomination Period Begins June 15 WASHINGTON, June 8, 2015 – The U.S. Department of Agriculture today announced that the nomination period for local Farm Service Agency (FSA) county committees begins on Monday, June 15, 2015. “Through the county committees, farmers and ranchers have a voice. Their opinions and ideas get to be heard on federal farm programs,” said Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack. “It is important for county committees to reflect America's diversity, so I encourage all eligible farmers and ranchers, including beginning farmers, to get involved in this year's elections. We’ve seen an increase in the number of nominations for qualified candidates, especially among women and minorities, and I hope that trend continues.” To be eligible to serve on a FSA county committee, a person must participate or cooperate in an agency administered program, be eligible to vote in a county committee election and reside in the local administrative area where they are nominated. Farmers and ranchers may nominate themselves or others. Organizations representing minorities and women also may nominate candidates. To become a candidate, an eligible individual must sign an FSA-669A nomination form. The form and other information about FSA county committee elections are available at www.fsa.usda.gov/elections. Nomination forms for the 2015 election must be postmarked or received in the local USDA Service Center by close of business on Aug. 3, 2015. FSA will mail election ballots to eligible voters beginning Nov. 9, 2015. Ballots will be due back to the local county office either via mail or in person by Dec. 7, 2015. Newly elected committee members and alternates will take office on Jan. 1, 2016. While FSA county committees do not approve or deny farm ownership or operating loans, they make decisions on disaster and conservation programs, emergency programs, commodity price support loan programs and other agricultural issues. Members serve three-year terms. Nationwide, there are about 7,800 farmers and ranchers serving on FSA county committees. Committees consist of three to 11 members that are elected by eligible producers. USDA is an equal opportunity provider and employer. To file a complaint of discrimination, write: USDA, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Civil Rights, Office of Adjudication, 1400 Independence Ave., SW, Washington, DC 20250-9410 or call (866) 632-9992 (Toll-free Customer Service), (800) 877-8339 (Local or Federal relay), (866) 377-8642 (Relay voice users).

COW/CALF CORNER

COW/CALF CORNER The Newsletter From the Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service June 8, 2015 In this Issue: Latest meat trade data encouraging Derrell S. Peel, Oklahoma State University Extension Livestock Marketing Specialist What to do with the bull after the breeding season? Glenn Selk; Oklahoma State University Emeritus Extension Animal Scientist Latest meat trade data encouraging Derrell S. Peel, Oklahoma State University Extension Livestock Marketing Specialist The latest trade data for April generally showed relative improvement in meat trade despite a variety of continuing challenges. The strong U.S. dollar continues to work against U.S. meat exports and support increased imports. The avian influenza outbreak continues to grow and impact poultry trade; while high prices and limited supplies are the biggest challenges for the beef sector. Despite bans or restrictions in most markets for U.S. poultry, broiler exports in April were fractionally higher than year ago levels holding year to date broiler exports to a decrease of 8.4 percent compared to last year. Most importantly among broiler export markets is Mexico, which was up 1.5 percent year over year in April and is up 4.8 percent for the year to date. Mexico is by far the largest broiler export market, accounting for 21 percent of total 2014 broiler exports. Year to date broiler exports to China and South Korea are down over 90 percent along with zero exports to Russia (banned in 2014 prior to avian influenza). Turkey exports were down 27.2 percent in April contributing to an 11.4 percent year to date decline compared to last year. Pork exports were up 10.9 percent in April, cutting the year to year date pork export decrease to 7.4 percent. This is the first year over year increase in monthly pork exports in 2015. Increased pork supplies and lower pork prices are overcoming the negative impacts of the strong U.S. dollar to boost pork exports. Among major pork export markets, year over year April exports were stronger to Japan (up 16.2 percent) and Mexico (up 15.2 percent), China (up 1.4 percent), and South Korea (up 43.2 percent) while Canada was down 13.9 percent. April U.S. beef exports were down 3.6 percent year over year, the smallest monthly decrease so far this year. Year to date beef exports are down 8.4 percent compared to 2014. Increased year over year April exports to Japan (up 4.8 percent) and South Korea (up 21.7 percent) contributed to year to date increases in U.S. beef exports to both countries. However, North American beef trade is more troubling with April decreases to Canada (down 10.4 percent) and Mexico (down 25.2 percent) contributing to year to date decreases in beef exports to both countries. The looming threat of tariffs related to Country of Origin Labeling adds to the prospects for weaker exports to Canada and Mexico in the coming months. April U.S. beef imports were up 27.5 percent compared to one year ago, the smallest monthly increase year over year so far this year. Year to date beef imports are up 40.9 percent compared to one year ago. Australia (up 36.7 percent) and New Zealand (up 28.2 percent) were the leading sources of beef imports in April along with Canada (up 4.6 percent) and Mexico (up 61.4 percent) compared to April, 2014. Beef imports from Brazil, though less than 4 percent of total beef imports in April, were up 95 percent year over year and are up 135 percent for the year to date compared to last year. What to do with the bull after the breeding season? Glenn Selk; Oklahoma State University Emeritus Extension Animal Scientist Maintaining a 60 to 75 day breeding and calving season can be one of the most important management tools for cow calf producers. A uniform, heavier, and more valuable calf crop is one key reason for keeping the breeding season short. Plus, more efficient cow supplementation and cow herd health programs are a product of a short breeding season. However, many small producers lose all of these money-making advantages, just because they do not have a pen or trap that will hold the bull away from cows and heifers for 9 to 10 months of the year. In an effort to learn what others do to overcome this obstacle, we had an email conversation with a Clemson University beef cattle specialist who passed along the method of fencing that they use to separate bulls from their cows. They use a minimum of 2 acres per bull for their bull pasture. Well fertilized introduced pastures (such as bermudagrass) in Eastern Oklahoma (with adequate rainfall) can stand this stocking density. However, native grass situations will require more acreages per bull unless the producer wants to feed a great deal of hay and supplement during much of the year. They use a five strand, high tensile fence with the strands spaced at 10 inches apart. High tensile wire is a heavy gauge, smooth wire that can be made as a permanent system with in-line wire stretchers The first strand is 10 inches above the ground. The end result is a fence that is 50 inches tall. The fence, of course, must be electrically charged. A GOOD high voltage, low amperage fence energizer or charger provides the energy source. The Clemson design uses the 2nd , 3rd, and 5th wire as charged wires, with the first and the 4th wire attached to grounds. See diagram below. The grounds will be most effective if they are set deep into the soil. This will allow for good “grounding” even when summer droughts cause top soil to become quite dry. Different designs may fit different situations. Some designs electrify the first wire (from the bottom) and make the second wire a ground. Talking to a commercial representative from a reputable fencing supply company can be very helpful. Oklahoma State University, in compliance with Title VI and VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, Executive Order 11246 as amended, Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, and other federal laws and regulations, does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, age, religion, disability, or status as a veteran in any of its policies, practices or procedures. This includes but is not limited to admissions, employment, financial aid, and educational services. References within this publication to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, service mark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not constitute or imply endorsement by Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service.

Friday, June 5, 2015

New Mexico 4-H Leaderline newsletter

Hello Everyone, The July – August – September 2015 issue of the New Mexico 4-H Leaderline newsletter is now online. To read the new issue of Leaderline, go to http://aces.nmsu.edu/4h/documents/leaderline_july-august-september-2015_web_copy.pdf. To read past issues, go to: http://aces.nmsu.edu/4h/newsletters.html and select a newsletter. For more information about the New Mexico 4-H Youth Development Program, including how to join, call the County Extension Office in your area at http://aces.nmsu.edu/county/. Sue Miller Graphic Designer Member of Association for Communication Excellence (ACE) (since 2007) 4-H Youth Development Program, MSC 3AE New Mexico State University PO Box 30003 Las Cruces, NM 88003-8003 sumiller@nmsu.edu Office: 575-646-5774 Fax: 575-646-3027 Website: http://nm4h.nmsu.edu Facebook: http://facebook.com/NMSU4H

Wednesday, June 3, 2015

New specialist at NMSU’s Chile Pepper Institute hails from migrant worker family

New specialist at NMSU’s Chile Pepper Institute hails from migrant worker family DATE: 06/03/2015 WRITER: Justin Bannister, 575-646-5981, jbannist@nmsu.edu CONTACT: Adan Delval, 575-646-3028, cpi@nmsu.edu Adan Delval is the newest program specialist at New Mexico State University’s Chile Pepper Institute. He holds a bachelor’s and a master’s degree from NMSU and, as an undergraduate student, took part in an agricultural research project sponsored by the National Science Foundation. He’s also from a migrant farm worker family. “I saw my parents struggle working in the fields,” he said. “I decided it wasn’t what I wanted to do with my life so I worked to pursue an education.” Born in Chihuahua, Delval’s family eventually moved to Columbus, New Mexico. There, he became familiar with NMSU, making several class trips to the university while in high school. After graduation, Delval followed some friends to NMSU to study government and Spanish. In 2008, he applied for and was accepted into the Chile Pepper Institute’s Agricultural Science Summer Undergraduate Research and Education Development, or ASSURED, program. It was designed to help students from migrant families learn how to conduct research and guide them toward careers in agricultural science. The program ran from 2003-2011 and paired college freshmen and sophomores from migrant farm families with NMSU faculty mentors for nine weeks each summer to design and complete a research project and report their findings in a research paper, poster and public seminar. “I’m proud that of the 90 students that went through the summer program, 99 percent of them graduated from college,” said Paul Bosland, director of the Chile Pepper Institute and principal investigator for the ASSURED program. Delval credits the program with exposing him to science and research experimentation. He spent a summer as an intern with Ryan Goss, an NMSU associate professor in the Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences, studying grasses and which kinds of fertilizer help them grow best in the Southwest. In his 2008 end-of-program essay Delval wrote, “I knew there were career opportunities out there, but ASSURED helped me to discover how a college education helps a person attain them.” Delval earned his bachelor’s in 2012 and later earned his master’s in public administration in 2014. Now, back at NMSU, he will work with the Chile Pepper Institute’s retail operation and assist with the calls that come in from around the world seeking information on chile peppers. “I’m looking forward to learning, and relearning, more about chile peppers,” he said. “I was born in Mexico, so with my family, we always eat everything with chile. There’s a passion for chile there. I’m also looking forward to speaking with people and answering their questions.” The Chile Pepper Institute is housed in NMSU’s Gerald Thomas Hall, Room 265. You can visit them online at chilepepperinstitute.org. - 30 -

Tuesday, June 2, 2015

MALTA STAR-THISTLE INVASION

MALTA STAR-THISTLE INVASION Malta star-thistle (Centaurea melitensis L.) was first found in Eddy County around 2003 or so along the truck by pass in Carlsbad. I carry a hoe in the truck for such occurrence and have rouged out a number of new invasive weed when I see them. I was too late for this one I did rouge out a patch only to find 20 or more down the highway. Since that time this weed has been the target of the Eddy County weed management group who have done their very best to stop this weed. But like the Russian thistle (tumble weed) it can now be found in the just about everywhere in the county and is moving from disturbed site such as road sides into fields and landscapes. It is a winter annual with a spiny yellow flowered head that reaches about 3 feet higher but under good growing condition can reach 4 feet. The spins are less than an 1.5 inches, which distinguishes it from its cousin yellow star-thistle. It reproduces by seed and can produce 1-60 seeds per flowering head. The leaves are withered usually by flowering time. This is a tricky weed though. It germinates in the fall, like the mustard, as soon as it has two true leaves it bolt and send up one flower that will have 1-5 seed in all less than 3 inches tall. So it is difficult to mow this flower off and it a guaranteed species survival for another year. There have been six biological control insects released for yellow star thistle. These insects feed on the seed thus reducing seed production. It is a wait and see if they will also help with Malta. Chemical control if applied at the right time of year works well. The systemic herbicides clopyralid or picloram work well when applied between December and April. Once the flower is set, chemical application don’t do the job. In alfalfa fields the use of the mustard herbicides when there are mustard weed present may help. Sheep and goat like to graze this weed until it get the spiny flower. It has no toxic effect but once the spine form they can lodge in the mouth and tong causing problems; however most animals will not try it. This weed is almost imposable to control by mechanical methods. So here it is the first part of June, the weed has set seed and the leaves are withered so they will not absorb herbicide. All you can do is hoe of cut the tops off catching the seed head and disposing them in a dumpster. Because of the flooding last year there is a lot of seed in the field and if you did not spry for mustard there is nothing you can do now. The seed will not germinate until late fall. Then you can control the mustard and this weed too hopefully. Subscribe to Eddy County Ag news at: http://nmsueddyag.blogspot.com/ Eddy County Extension Service, New Mexico State University is an equal opportunity/affirmative action employer and educator. All programs are available to everyone regardless of race, color, religion, sex, age, handicap, or national origin. New Mexico State University, U.S. Department of Agriculture, and the Eddy County Government Cooperating.

binar to Assist Potential Applicants for Conservation Funding

Webinar to Assist Potential Applicants for Conservation Funding Regional Conservation Partnership Program to make $235 Million Available to Partners WASHINGTON, June 2, 2015 – An upcoming webinar on the Regional Conservation Partnership Program (RCPP) will help potential applicants as they seek available funding. During the current round, the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) will invest up to $235 million to improve the nation's water quality, combat drought, enhance soil health, support wildlife habitat and protect agricultural production. Partners will match the Federal investment. "This webinar is a great opportunity to directly engage with our partners," said Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack. "Our goal is to leverage available Federal funding and produce more high-performing on-the-ground conservation solutions." USDA's Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) will host the webinar, open to both conservation partners and the general public, on Thursday, June 4, 2015 from 2 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. EST. To join the webinar, visit https://usdanrcs.adobeconnect.com/r75qxphcya9/ . Login to Adobe Connect using the Guest option and enter your name. NRCS recently simplified the application process by creating new online tools: a pre-proposal fillable form, RCPP pre-application data entry tool and pre-proposal data entry tool instructions. These tools support partners as they fill out and submit their pre-proposal application. RCPP empowers local leaders to work with multiple partners — such as private companies, local and tribal governments, universities, non-profit groups and other non-government partners — along with farmers, ranchers, and forest landowners to design solutions that work best for their region. Local partners and the federal government both invest funding and manpower to projects to maximize their impact. USDA is now accepting pre-proposals for RCPP. Pre-proposals are due July 8, 2015. For more information on applying, visit the RCPP website. #